Whoa, an epiphany in writing dialogue

116564_6429In one of my favorite books on graphic design, The Non-Designer’s Design Book, Robin Williams presents the concept of being able to name something so that you can own it. A person may recognize good design in a poster or a brochure, but not be able to know why it’s good design. In her book, she claims to present four basic design elements to master–contrast, repetition, alignment, and proximity–so that a potential graphic designer will understand why an item has good design.

The same thing sort of just happened to me when it comes to writing dialogue.

Author K.M. Weiland recently posted an article on her blog, Get Rid of On-the-Nose Dialogue Once and For All. In this article she presents three ways to make boring and obvious dialogue more interesting by including subtext, irony and silence. I already knew about these methods, but Weiland presented them in a simple way and even used one of my favorite–if subtle- scenes from the movie Gladiator as an example. Now I feel like I can own these methods when writing dialogue for my own fiction and point out when they are and aren’t being used in novels I am reading.

Weiland has great resources for honing your fiction writing skills. Check out her website for writers.

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Author: mazeface

Two things I love to do the most include graphic design and writing. I was an editor at a publishing company for several years; I saw the graphic designers at work and thought, 'I'd like to do that.' So I went to art school. I love to read, write and draw. Yes, I am a creative nerd type. I like to read all kinds of books, but science fiction and fantasy is my guilty pleasure. Why am I keeping this blog? It's just a place to keep my thoughts. My brain is getting too full to store them all, so this place is a good annex.

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