What I’m learning as I write my novel

unpeeled onionWhen I say I’ve written six novels, this is what I really mean: I’ve written the rough draft of six novels. Sure I like to say “I’ve written six novels” to try to impress people, but if anyone would read these “novels”, he would read for five minutes, stick out his tongue, squinch up his face, hold the manuscript with his index finger and thumb as if holding a dirty diaper and dispose of it in the trash as if it smelled like said dirty diaper.

Here’s the truth: I’ve written six rough drafts National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). Five of the rough drafts are part of a science fiction series I’ve been writing. The first NaNoWriMo novel I wrote is a stand-alone story.

Even after NaNoWriMo is over I’ll continue rewriting and polishing the manuscript, but then I get busy. And suddenly it’s November again—NaNoWriMo month—and I have a new idea and write a whole new story for the series.

This year I finished NaNoWriMo by writing the minimum 50,000 words, but I still have several chapters to write to finish the story. That’s what I’m doing now. The good news is that I more motivated than I’ve ever been to finish and rewrite the story. This year I planned out the novel differently than before and I feel it’s been a boon.

As I continue writing the rough draft of my sixth novel, here is what I’m learning:

  • A rough draft is really a “discovery draft.” Discovering the story is like peeling and onion. Sure, before I started writing, I made a list of scenes and sketched out some of the main characters, but I discover so much more about my characters and story as I write. I just keep finishing the discover draft, however, knowing that I will change and add later.
  • This year, I planned my novel a little differently: first of all, I made a list of scenes (one sentence each) and plugged the list into the three-act-structure. The three-act-structure is lauded by many and disliked by many, but it helped me think about suspense, conflict and rhythm for my story. Next, I took this list and labelled the scenes according to the hero’s journey. I was pleased that my outline seemed to fall right into the sequence of the hero’s journey. For example, toward the beginning of the story, part of the hero’s journey is “meeting a mentor.” And right there, in proper order, I had my protagonist run into a character who matched the description of being the “mentor.” (By the way, it’s perfectly legitimate to do all this planning before NaNoWriMo starts; the writing of the “discovery draft” begins on November 1st.) Here is a diagram that helped me see how to combine the three-act-structure with the hero’s journey.characters: they have goals; they will change by end of novel; need more inner emotions and thoughts for the protagonist.
  • I am writing this discovery draft using only the point-of-view of my protagonist. This means I am writing only scenes in which he is present and interacting with other characters or progressing the story himself. I include description, inner feelings and inner monologue related only to him. As a result, some of the other main characters don’t feel as well-developed as I’d like. The reader only sees them from the viewpoint of my protagonist. This may not be a bad thing, but as I rewrite, I may add scenes from the viewpoint of two of the other main characters. This would add some subplots that are not getting fully developed in this discovery draft. This may or may not be a good idea, but I will try it and see.
  • thumbMaking a fake cover for my novel has helped keep me motivated. I did this for all my rough drafts in this series I’m creating using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator and I had a lot of fun.
  • I have more lessons I’m learning as I write my current novel and I will talk about those in a later post. For now, I wanted to write about the realizations that come up. Just doing that is helpful and keeps me motivated.
Advertisements

Author: mazeface

Two things I love to do the most include graphic design and writing. I was an editor at a publishing company for several years; I saw the graphic designers at work and thought, 'I'd like to do that.' So I went to art school. I love to read, write and draw. Yes, I am a creative nerd type. I like to read all kinds of books, but science fiction and fantasy is my guilty pleasure. Why am I keeping this blog? It's just a place to keep my thoughts. My brain is getting too full to store them all, so this place is a good annex.

2 thoughts on “What I’m learning as I write my novel”

  1. Good post, Andy. I have learned some similar lessons as I write nonfiction. I’ve started many books and article and throw them in a folder, determined (our journalism prof Miss Eynon would hate “bound and determined, wouldn’t she?) to finish it later. I have hundreds of those folders. Keep going.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s